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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006 as counsel to the presiden
to come, cheeseburgers, fries, milk shakes in the name of science. >> why people are loading up on the fast food and getting paid amazing money to do it. it is all coming up. ♪ cheeseburger in paradise ♪ heaven on earth ♪ >> the next story either seems like a dream come true or a disaster waiting to happen. eating fast food, every day, and getting paid thousands to do it. >> big money here. all a new experiment conducted by doctors to measure exactly what fast food diets can do to you. abc's john donvan has the story. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. two sausage burritos. >> reporter: over and over and over again. it has been dave's life the past three months or so as has been eating the food. a precisely measured, 1,000 calories a day, extra meal daily, fast food only. >> how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein a researcher at washington medical school in st. louis trying to understand why weight gain ladies to diseases like diabetes and hypertension and how that relate
as a politicalf th science and journalism -- he pivoted to some of the positions that he explicitly set aside during the primaries, where he became truly one of the most -- there were others, rick santorum and newt gingrich -- extremist candidates on key issues that appeal to independents. when a pos -- one of the most interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's
intelligence estimate and an independent assessment by the national academy of sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i'm bret baier in washington. the big story here today, new explanation from the obama administration released late this afternoon about what happened in the deadly attack at the u.s. mission in libya. tonight on "special report," the director of national intelligence revise what is he calls the initial assessment that the attack was result of out-of-control mob outraged by anti-muslim video. we have new information on how bad the security may have been at the benghazi compound. we'll explore detailed timeline for what the obama administration did and said in the hours and days following the deadly attack. this is the final weekend before the first presidential debate. both candidates are preparing and raising cash for final six weeks. there is plenty of financial worry in europe tonight. big decisions are made in spain, greece, and france. we'll have a report tonight from london. it's friday. that means the friday lightning round. "special report" from washington starts at 6:00 eastern. now send it back to new york and "the fi
-- practicing for months. >> rick: susan estrich is a professor of law and political science, fox news contributor. i love watching both sigh tries raise the bar for the opponent. kind of like a joke, isn't it susan? >> it is a pretty good joke. look, bottle of these guys are running for -- both of these guys are running for president. i think voters have a right to have high expectations about both of them. this gameworks when you are in primaries and it is a long process and it is up and down. i don't think it works in debates, unless like the clip you just showed you have somebody like reagan, who had been constantly attacked that he was not ready, not capable. and the fact that he turned in a completely solid debate performance against a guy, carter who was not liked at all that won the floor fell out. ironly debate, the people who come in for -- usually the debates the people who come in for romney, will come out for romney the people who come out for obama will come out for obama unless there's a big mistake one way or another probably won't change much. >> rick: likely voters we
the political campaign. his book is the victory lap. the secret science of winning campaigns. .. but, maybe i should start by orienting people to what the school book is. it's part of a series that oxford publishes called a very short introduction and they are short, they have about 300 titles, and they asked me to do a supreme court title. i guess about three years ago and the book cannot this spring. it came out on the eve of the health care decision. so, who knew three years ago that we would be faced with a supreme court dealing with the most closely watched and maybe one of the most contentious case in many many years, and i would be happy -- the book doesn't say anything about the health care case, so in the q&a, i would be happy to share some conversations about that with you. but i thought i would step back and give a little bit of my take on how the court has gotten to where it is, not so much current events, but really looking back to read the book starts with a little history. it's not a book of history. i may court watcher is what i think of myself as a core group be. what is inte
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> you got obama phone? >> yes, everybody in cleveland, all minority got obama phone. keep obama in president, you know. he gave us a phone. >> he gave you a phone? how did he give you a phone? >> you sign up. you're on social security, you got low-income, you disability. >> sean: all right. so we had obama phone. maybe obama bucks. i play this tape often my radio show where a woman says, right after obama's elected i'll never have to worry about putting gas in my car again. i'll never have to worry about paying my mortgage. this is obama mania. apparently it still exists. where does this mentality come from? remember the guy that was going, oh, mr. president, oh? remember that guy? >> no. i missed that one. this proves that liberal policies hurt black people. democrats don't care as long as the blacks keep voting for democrats. they keep telling blacks republicans hate you and make fun of us for having no blacks vote for us. the unemployment f
the social science dictum that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. as a wire service guy, i am not in the prognostication business, but i feel fairly safe going out on a limb in a couple of things today. eight months ago, in the state of the union speech, obama issued an appeal to congress to spend more federal money on construction projects that would generate jobs. what he said was, take the money we are no longer spending at war. use half of the to pay down our debt. use the rest to do some nation building right here at home. we pointed out in a fact check that night the fallacy of that idea. the idea that some kind of budget surplus is going to be created when you stop the wars is fiscal fiction. those wars have been primarily financed by borrowing. if you stop the wars, you do not have new money, you just have less debt being added. it does not treat a pool of ready cash. on top of that, the supposed savings of this supposed peace dividend is inflated because it is based on spending numbers that are extrapolated into the future that would come from the height of the
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. try the #1 gastroenterologist recommended probiotic. align. align naturally helps maintain digestive balance. ♪ ooh, baby, can i do for you today? ♪ try align today. lavar. >>> welcome back to the ed show. mitt romney did something truly unusual even for him. 17 days after his infamous 47% remarks he now says he was wrong. sean hannity asked romney. what would he have said if president obama had raised the 47% remarks in the debate the other night? here is romney's answer. >> clearly in a campaign with hundreds if not thousands of speeches and question and answer sessions now and then you're going to say something that doesn't come out right. in this case i said something that is just completely wrong. and i absolutely believe, however, that my life has shown that i care about 100%. >> president obama didn't bring up the 47% remarks in the debate and caught a lot of flack for it. i question it here on this network to one of his advisers. but he probably wanted to avoid giving romney the chance to address it in
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
a strong science and technology directorate that has worked cooperatively to develop tests and transition deployable cyber solutions and technology. among its many projects, it is leading efforts to develop more secure internet protocol to protect consumers and industry. because each member of the public plays an important role in saturday -- cyber security, which sponsored a campaign which is a year-round effort designed to engage and challenged americans to join the effort to practice and promote safe on- line practices. we want good cyber habits to be as ingrained and as familiar as putting on your seat belt. if you are not already a friend of the campaign, i encourage you to join today. in a few days, we will kick off national cyber security awareness month which is an opportunity each october to emphasize the culture of shared responsibility necessary to maintain a safe, secure, and resilience cyber environment appeared we must work internationally because the cyber demint does not respect traditional national boundaries. attacks can and do to emanate from any place around the world.
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
political science professor describes it as a scenario where you essentially have two minority parties. bill: jonathan serrie watching that out of atlanta. thank you. martha: new developments in the investigation into the loose seats on american airlines flights. have you heard about this? we are also hearing about how one pilot reacted to the scare as he diverted the plane. are you receiving a payout from a legal settlement or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. martha: the funny man behind "family guy" will be making stars laugh and cry, most likely, at the oscars. mcfarlane will host the 85th academy awa
's not an accident. it was actually planned in the name of science, trying to prove if you could survive a catastrophe just like this. people behind the fiery experiment will join us to talk about what they learned. >>> an emotional ann romney talks about a ritual her husband will prepare before the presidential debate. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners gi
of the college of arts and sciences at the university of southern california, an expert on biological clocks. good morning. >> good morning. how are you? >> i am good. i must say that your most creative at 9 p.m. was most surprising to me. by 9 p.m. i am exhausted. >> yes. what we're learning from research over the last few years is really our bodies are an orchestra of different biological rhythms coordinated by a central clock in the brain. we're able to perform different tachks optimally at different times of the take. the creative aspect of the 9 p.m. comes from a combination of being a little bit sleepy and what research has shown us is that kind of state enables us to be more creative and less held down by our common worries of the day. >> interesting. why is it best to have a difficult conversation in the morning? >> that i think comes from research that shows us that we have quite strong 24 hour rhythms in our cognitive abilities to our abilities to perform computation, complex tasks, all of that tends to start to peak from the middle of the morning through to the middle of the after
. >> brian: our science is not skewed. >> gretchen: president obama up five points. >> they are over polling. >> gretchen: over all president obama is up in the fox news poll. but when you break it down. this is an important question. this would be who gets out of bed. the choice for president in extremely interested voters and people who are extremely motivate get up and get out of the pajamas. 56 percent obama-boid bide and 49 percent rom no, ryan. >> brian: there is no rule to show you cane vote in pajamas. cath rein sebilluous said vote for my guy. the problem is you are not suppose tod do that because you are a cabinet secretary. show broke the law by giving that speech and endorsing her boss president obama. she learned her lesson i am sure? >> gretchen: this weekend back on the cam campaign trail and attending in permanent capacity and i wonder if people will be listening to see if she endorses anybody on the campaign trail. >> brian: they can. but they have to say it is it a campaign even. remember when president obama said we shouldn't do super pacs and then flip flopped . he kent k
. and now we've got to do mor by hiring 100,000 new math and science teachers. by making sure that we're providing millions of new slots for folks to retrain at community colleges for the jobs that exist right now. continue to lower tuition costs for students so they're not loaded up with debt once they graduate. my opponent thinks that it makes sense for us to gut our investment in education in order to give a tax break to the wealthy. i disagree. i think what the united states of america means is that no child should be deprived of a good education. it means that no family should have to set aside a college acceptance letter just because they don't have the money. and no employer should have to look for workers with the right skills in china instead of the united states of america. i want us to focus on education. that's what we've been doing. that's what we're going to keep on doing in a second term when i'm president of the united states. >> all right. so you get a flavor of what the president's saying at a fundraiser. he's doing a few of these fundraisers here in washington today
ryan supporters, it's not politics. it's math. liberals talk about science and now conservatives are like all of this budget stuff, sorry, is just math. we have to slash medicare and so forth. so it is funny that the party of math now is like creating their own -- >> alternate polling. >> sheila, i want to get your thoughts on this. i want to note for people watching this, josh, you worked on mitt romney's 2002 gubernatorial campaign. >> that's right. >> you've been a republican -- i don't know if you are a registered republican. >> i am. >> you worked for bob dole. i want to make sure people watching, we're not a bunch of liberals talking about those crazy people out there because you've been in the republican party. you worked on the republican party. i think you consider yourself a republican now? >> absolutely. >> i'm curious what you make of this. am i wrong? is this a natural human instinct that the internet cult at this vats and people do it or is there a broader issue here with this kind of turning inward if that's happened i think among the right? >> well, i think it's k
at it is not positivistic social science. hitit is geographical. it is historical. grandfather. an example would be the rival visions of the military. the senior general in the americans think of your army and how sergeant gonzales from los angeles and the corporal from chicago and the major from new jersey all come into the military. thatyou are all put into the military and it is a uniformwe see this part of the world, needing a regimental area. in your attempt to define the are comfortable with, you are missing the point. they see the america effort, a transformational vision of in hamas hamas afghanistan, that transformation effort -- little girls go to school, making it into something, spending a huge amount of money. i would argue the pakistanis have a static notion. russians. they will beat you. i am agreeing with you in coming to some sort of closure in what afghanistan is. it is not that we think of the problem in the same way and disagreed. we think about the problem differently. language with which to talk a n who afghanistan. how will we come down to the tactical questions, etc., tha
, of course. but have they dictated the outcome of an election? a lot of political science suggests only twice. in the 1960s, 1960 election when richard nixon came out looking very haggard against the sharp and attractive john f. kennedy, and in 2000 when gore was condescending toward george w. bush. the point is, more than zingers, what seems to affect the outcome is your general likability. how you come across. last point, carol, i saw newt gingrich give advice to mitt romney. he said that these debates. his expert told him it's 85% visual, how you look, 10% how you say something, your tone, and 5%, only 5% what you actually say. that would certainly reinforce this likability prism. >> well, that 5%'s kind of depressing. >> it is. >> well, let me ask you this about likability. remember in 2008, obama had a problem with likability and he's turned that around. he's now the more likable candidate. there is a danger to him to appear unlikable in this debate if he gets too snippy or too condescending or too professorial. >> absolutely because he's coming from a position of authority or power. eve
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
are the only things that matter, so history, social studies, science -- >> do not forget band and drummer. >> another thing we need to do and how to grow young people who are informed citizens, what can our organizations do more about that? >> and cate school boards. school boards often times dictate the curriculum. if you're teaching african- american history starting with 1865 on through, and that is all you get about black folks and latinos history starts with 2006 -- [laughter] that this house some of these issues are being framed. when you're not voting and looking at the bigger picture and say i will not worry about the school board race because as long as obama wins, that is all that counts, you have kids who did not understand history and why the need to be involved going for parry >> democrats control every state my position in texas in the past. the way republicans took over the state of texas, they first ran for the state board of education. democrats totally overlooked it, but they recognized it was pure politics. they said look at the election and they saw how many votes it t
. there's no science to that, but when you see the explosion of smart phones they think they could be related. >> clayton: drowning deaths in fact, many parents busy at the pool, and not paying attention, deaths due to drowning and detrimental to see the kids on the smart phone when are' not with them and present, and psychologically. >> alisyn: that part is true, i try to put it away at home and at home, but our playground, oh. >> dave: well, hopefully you're not all-- give us good stories of times you may have been buried in the phone, not grim things, but something silly may have happened, a bump and a bruise, something like that e we'll talk about it later on the show. >> alisyn: to your headlines because new hope for families of victims of 9/11. the new york post reports the city forensic scientists will use a new tool to try to identify new remains, can take dna from bone fragments and identify person's eye and skin color. that's incredible. right now can only determine the sex. 1,120 remains still have not been identified. experts hope that soon they will be able to narrow d
and science. if you look at higher ed the university system we have the best universities in the world. what's the difference? universities are competitive, compete for professors, research contracts, students. k through 12 a monopoly. you have a public monopoly on one side and capitalism, competition on the other side. we excel where there's competition, we suck where there's none. >> we're not going to talk about health care now but that's going to become much less competitive and much less private sector involvement as well and that's 20% of the economy. >> well at least the public has kind of expressed its public opinion on it. >> 53-43. it's not going to be repealed if president obama gets reelected. >> unlikely. >> it's 53-43. >> 53-43 and you haven't had anything -- >> disapprove-approve or obama. >> you haven't had let's rip money out of the medicare part of it and the promises about lower health care premiums have certainly not survived. i mean we've seen, what, 8% or 9% increase in health care premiums the last two years. >> craig barrett of intel is going to be our guest host for
to actually do something that will be good for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and bu
at science history, cyber world, popular culture and computer networking in politics. live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> next a symposium on partisan politics and compromise. this hour and a half event is hosted by the university of southern california schwarzenegger's institute for state and global policy. panelists include senator john mccain and former senator tom daschle. >> we all breathe the same air. ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the chairman of the institute and the inaugural holder of the governor downey chair professor of state and global policy at u.s.e., governor arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you very much. thank you very much for the fantastic introduction. that's exactly the way i wrote it. [laughter] also thank you very much for your great partnership. one thing i wanted to correct what you said today is i did not win miss universe. different bikinis, waxing, all of those things i did not win that competition. it's mr. universe. anyway, i want to say how enthusiastic i am about being in partnership with u.s.c. the preside
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)